Fake Milk Gains Dominance As Synthetic Options Intimidate Traditional Dairy Farms

Fake-Milk-Gains-dominance-As-Synthetic-Options-Intimidate-Traditional-Dairy-Farms

Fake milk gains dominance as synthetic options intimidate traditional dairy farms. Consumers could soon be confused as far as dairy aisle is concerned as they will ponder that the milk they are consuming was the product of a cow or made in lab. Perfect Day Foods is one company generating synthetic milk substitute. Its homogenous to milk as in it comprises of casein and whey, the proteins constituted in milk. But a cow was never utilized to produce their commodity. Rather the animal-free dairy product is rendered in lab utilizing genetically engineered yeast arranged with DNA to generate the similar proteins discovered in cow’s milk.

Silicon Valley-based Perfect Day Foods said that its animal free milk is superior for the environment and wholesome than cow’s milk as its lactose free, hormone-free, antibiotic-free, gluten-free and cholesterol-free. The company also professes the product tastes much like milk than any of its plant based options. Additionally, its comprehensive environmental influence is considerably less than that of everyday produced milk.

While some vegan consumers may be enthralled by the introduction of contemporary options dairy farmers are not. Many trifling dairy farmers are anxious that this contemporary fake milk will baffle consumers and could make them extinct as they already encounter extinction from an overabundance of milk, escalating contention from plant based dairy options and industrial farming.

According to a report the US dairy has been going through paramount pressure lately encountering a sales plummeting since 2014 which is anticipated to resume till 2020.

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Curt Reaves

About the Author: Curt Reaves

Curt Reaves started working for Nuhey in 2016. Curt grew up in a small town in northern Iowa. He studied chemistry in college, graduated, and married his wife one month later. He has been a proud Texan for the past 5 years. Curt covers politics and the economy. Previously he wrote for the Washington City Paper, The Hill newspaper, Slate Magazine, and ABCNews.com.